Prehistoric Food Production in the Midcontinental United States

A Selected Bibliography

David R. George

Department of Anthropology

University of Connecticut


 
Anderson, E.
     1952 Plants, Man and Life. Little Brown and Co., Boston.
 
     1956 Man as a Maker of New Plants and New Plant Communities.
          In Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth, edited
          by W. Thomas, pp. 763-777. University of Chicago Press,
          Chicago.
 
Asch, D. and N. Asch
     1977 Chenopod as Cultigen: A Re-evaluation of Some
          Prehistoric Collections from Eastern North America.
          Mid-Continental of Archaeology 2:3-45.
     
     1979 Woodland Subsistence and Settlement in West-Central
          Illinois. In Hopewell Archaeology, edited by D. Brose
          and N. Greber, pp. 80-85. Kent State University Press,
          Kent, Ohio.
 
     1985 Prehistoric Plant Cultivation in West-Central Illinois.
          In Prehistoric Food Production in North America, edited
          by R. Ford, pp. 149-203. Museum of Anthropology,
          Anthropological Paper No. 75. University of Michigan,
          Ann Arbor.
 
Asch, N. and D, Asch
     1978 The Economic Potential of Iva annua and its Prehistoric
          Importance in the Lower Illinois River Valley. In The  
          Nature and Status of Ethnobotany. edited by R. Ford,   
          pp. 300-341. Museum of Anthropology, Anthropological   
          Papers No. 67. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
 
     1985 Archeobotany. In The Hill Creek Homestead, edited by M.
          Conner, pp. 115-170. Center for American Archaeology,
          Kampsville Archaeological Center, Research Series 1.
 
Bareis, C. and J. Porter (editors)
     1984 American Bottom Archaeology. University of Illinois
          Press, Urbana. 
 
Brown, J.
     1985 Long-Term Trends to Sedentism and the Emergence of
          Complexity in the American Midwest. In Prehistoric
          Hunter-Gatherers: The Emergence of Cultural Complexity,
          edited by T.D. Price and J Brown, pp. 201-234. Academic
          Press, Orlando, Florida.
 
Chapman, J. and G. Grites
     1987 Evidence for Early Maize (Zea mays) from the Ice-house
          Bottom Site, Tennessee. American Antiquity 52:352-354.
 
Chapman, J. and A. Shea
     1981 The Archaeobotanical record: Early Archaic Period to
          Contact in the Lower Little Tennessee River Valley.
          Tennessee Anthropologist 6:64-84.
 
Chomko, S. and G. Crawford
     1978 Plant Husbandry in Prehistoric Eastern North America:
          New Evidence for its Development. American Antiquity
          43:405-408.
 
Christenson, A.
     1980 Change in the Human Food Niche in Response to
          Population Growth. In Modeling Change in Prehistoric
          Subsistence Economies, edited by T. Earle and A.
          Christenson, pp. 31-72. Academic Press, Orlando,
          Florida. 
 
Conard, N., D. Asch, N. Asch, D. Elmore, H. Gove, M. Rubin, J.
Brown, M. Wiant, K. Farnsworth and T. Cook
     1984 Accelerator Radiocarbon Dating of Evidence for
          Prehistoric Horticulture in Illinois. Nature 308:443-
          446.
 
Cowan, C.
     1978 The Prehistoric Use and Distribution of Maygrass in
          Eastern North America: Cultural and Phyto-Geographical
          Implications. In the Nature and Status of Ethnobotany,
          edited by R. Ford, pp. 263-288. Museum of Anthropology,
          Anthropological Paper No. 67. University of Michigan,
          Ann Arbor.
 
     1985a From Foraging to Incipient Food Production:           
           Subsistence Change and Continuity on the Cumberland
           Plateau of Eastern Kentucky. Ph.D. dissertation,
           Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan,
           University Microfilms, Ann Arbor.
 
     1985b Understanding the Evolution of Plant Husbandry in
           Eastern North America: Lessons from Botany,           
           Ethnography, and Archaeology. In Prehistoric Food
           Production in North America, edited by R. Ford, pp.
           205-244. Anthropological Paper No. 75. Museum of
           Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
 
Cowan, C., H. Jackson, K. Moore, A. Nickelhoff and T. Smart
     1981 The Cloudsplitter Rockshelter, Menifee County,
          Kentucky: A Preliminary Report. Southeastern
          Archaeological Conference Bulletin 24:60-75.
 
Cowan, C. and P. Watson
     1992 The Origins of Agriculture: An International           
          Perspective. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington,
          D.C.
 
Crites, G.
     1978 Plant Food Utilization Patterns during the Middle
          Woodland Owl Hollow Phase in Tennessee: A Preliminary
          Report. Tennessee Anthropologist 3:79-92.
 
     1985 Middle Woodland Paleoethnobotany of the Eastern
          Highland Rim of Tennessee: An Evolutionary Perspective
          on Change in Human-Plant Interaction. Ph.D.
          dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of
          Tennessee, Knoxville. 
 
     1987 Human-Plant Mutualism and Niche Expression in the
          Paleoethnobotanical record. American Antiquity 52:725.
 
Crites, G. and R. Terry
     1984 Nutritive Value of Maygrass, Phalaris caroliniana.
          Economic Botany 38:114-120.   
 
Decker, D.
     1988 Origin(s), Evolution and Systematics of Cucurbita pepo
          (Cucurbitaceae). Economic Botany 42:4-15. (1987?)
 
Decker-Walters
     1990 Evidence for Multiple Domestications of Cucurbita pepo.
          In Biology and Utilization of the Cucurbitaceae, edited
          by D. Bates and C. Jeffrey, pp. 96-101. Cornell
          University Press, Ithaca, New York. 
     
Doran, G., D. Dickel and L. Newsom
     1990 A 7,290-Year-Old Bottle Gourd from the Windover Site,
          Florida. American Antiquity 55:354-360.
 
Earle, T.
     1980 A Model of Subsistence Change. In Modeling Change in
          Prehistoric Subsistence Economies, edited by T. Earle
          and A. Christenson, pp. 1-29. Academic Press, Orlando,
          Florida.
 
Ford, R.
     1979a Paleoethnobotany in American Archaeology. In Advances
           in Archaeological Method and Theory, vol. 2, edited by
           M. Schiffer, pp. 285-336. Academic Press, Orlando,    
           Florida.
 
     1979b Gathering and Gardening: Trends and Consequences of   
           Hopewell Subsistence Strategies. In Hopewell          
           Archaeology, edited by D. Brose and N. Greber, pp.    
           234-238. Kent State University Press, Kent, Ohio. 
 
     1981 Gardening and Farming Before A.D. 1,000: Patterns of
          Prehistoric Cultivation North of Mexico. Journal of
          Ethnobiology 1:6-27.
 
     
     1985 Patterns of Prehistoric Food Production in North
          America. In Prehistoric Food Production in North
          America, edited by R. Ford, pp. 341-364. Museum of
          Anthropology, Anthropological Paper No. 75. University
          of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
 
Fortier, A.
     1985 Middle Woodland occupations at the Truck 7 and Go-Kart
          South Sites. In Selected Sites in the Hill Lake
          Locality, edited by A. Fortier, pp. 163-281. American
          Bottom Archaeology FAI-270 Site Reports 13. University
          of Illinois Press, Urbana.
 
Fowler, M.
     1971 The Origin of Plant Cultivation in the Central
          Mississippi Valley: A Hypothesis. In Prehistoric
          Agriculture, edited by S. Struever, pp. 112-128.
          Natural History Press, Garden City, New York.
 
Fritz, G.
     1984 Identification of Cultigen Amaranth and Chenopod from
          Rockshelter Sites in Northwest Arkansas. American
          Antiquity 49:558-572.
 
     1986 Prehistoric Ozark Agriculture: The University of
          Arkansas Rockshelter Collections. Ph.D. dissertation,
          Department of Anthropology, University of North
          Carolina, Chapel Hill.
 
     1990 Multiple Pathways to Farming in Precontact Eastern
          North America. In Journal of World Prehistory, vol. 4,
          edited by F. Wendorf and A. Close, pp. 387-435. Plenum
          Publishing, New York.
 
     1992 "Newer," "Better," Maize and the Mississippian
          Emergence; A Critique of Prime Mover Explanations. In
          Late Prehistoric Agriculture: Observations from the
          Midwest, edited by W. Woods, Chapter 2. Illinois
          Historic Preservation Agency, Studies in Illinois
          Archaeology 7, Springfield.
 
Fritz, G. and B. Smith
     1988 Old Collections and New Technology: Documenting the
          Domestication of Chenopodium in Eastern North America.
          Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology 13:3-27.
 
Gardner, P.
     1987 Plant Food Subsistence at Salts Cave, Kentucky: New
          Evidence. American Antiquity 52:358-364.
 
Gilmore, M.
     1931 Vegetal Remains of the Ozark Bluff-Dweller-Culture.
          Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and
          Letters 14:83-105.
 
Goslin, R.
     1952 Cultivated and Wild Food from Aboriginal Sites in Ohio.
          Ohio Archaeologist 2:9-29.
 
Gregg, S.
     1988 Foragers and Farmers. University of Chicago Press,
          Chicago.  
 
Gremillion, K. and R. Yarnell
     1986 Plant Remains from the Westmoreland-Barber and Pitman-
          Alder Sites, Marion County, Tennessee. Tennessee
          Anthropologist 2:1-20.
 
Harlan, J.
     1971 Agricultural Origins: Centers and Non-Centers. Science
          174:468-474.
 
Harlan, J. and J. de Wet
     1965 Some Thoughts about Weeds. Economic Botany 19:16-24.
 
Heiser, C.
     1949 Enigma of the Weeds. Frontiers 13:148-150.
 
     1979 Origins of Some Cultivated New World Plants. Annual
          Review of Ecology and Systematics 10:309-326.
 
     1985a Some Botanical Considerations of the Early       
           Domesticated Plants North of Mexico. In Prehistoric
           Food Production in North America, edited by R. Ford,
           pp. 57-72. Museum of Anthropology, Anthropological
           Paper No. 75. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
 
     1985b Of Plants and People. University of Oklahoma Press,
           Norman.
 
     1988 Aspects of Unconscious Selection and the Evolution of
          Domesticated Plants. Euphytica 37:77-85.
 
     
     1989 Domestication of Cucurbiticeae: Cucurbita and
          Lagenaria. In Foraging and Farming, edited by D. Harris
          and G. Hillman, pp. 471-481. Unwin Hyman, London.
 
     1990 New Perspectives on the Origin and Evolution of New
          World Domesticated Plants: Summary. Economic Botany
          44(3):111-116.
 
Jackson, H.
     1986 Sedentism and Hunter-Gatherer Adaptations in the Lower
          Mississippi Valley. Ph.D. dissertation, Department of
          Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
          University Microfilms, International.
 
Johannessen, S.
     1981 Plant Remains from the Truck 7 Site. In Archaeological
          Investigations of the Middle Woodland Occupation at the
          Truck 7 and Go Kart South Sites, by A. Fortier, pp.
          116-130. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
          Department of Anthropology, FAI-270 Archaeological
          Mitigation Project Report 30.
 
     1983 Plant Remains from the Cement Hollow Phase. In The Mund
          Site, by A. Fortier, F. Finney, and L. LaCampagne, pp.
          94-103. American Bottom Archaeology FAI-270 Site Report
          5. University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago.
 
     1984 Paleoethnobotany. In American Bottom Archaeology,
          edited by C. Bareis and J. Porter, pp. 197-214.
          University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago.
     
Jones, V.
     1936 The Vegetal Remains of Newt Kash Hollow Shelter. In
          Rock Shelters in Menifee County, Kentucky, edited by W.
          Webb and W. Funkhauser, pp. 147-165. Reports in
          Archaeology and Anthropology 3(4). University of
          Kentucky, Lexington.
 
Kay, M.
     1986 Phillips Spring: A Synopsis of Sedalia Phase Settlement
          and Subsistence. In Foraging, Collecting and
          Harvesting: Archaic Period Subsistence and Settlement
          in the Eastern Woodlands, edited by S. Neusius, pp.
          275-288. Center for Archaeological Investigations,
          Occasional Paper 6. Southern Illinois University,
          Carbondale. 
 
Kay, M., F. King and C. Robinson
     1980 Curcubits from Phillips Spring: New Evidence and
          Interpretations. American Antiquity 45(4):806-822.
 
King, F.
     1985 Early Cultivated Cucurbits in Eastern North America. In
          Prehistoric Food Production in North America, edited
          by R. Ford, pp. 73-98. Museum of Anthropology,
          Anthropological Paper No. 75. University of Michigan,
          Ann Arbor.
 
Kline, G., G. Crites and C. Faulkner
     1982 The McFarland Project: Early Middle Woodland Settlement
          and Subsistence in the Upper Duck River Valley in
          Tennessee. Tennessee Anthropological Association
          Miscellaneous Paper 8.
 
Linton, R.
     1924 The Significance of Certain Traits in North American
          Maize Culture. American Anthropologist 26:345-349.
 
Miller, C.
     1960 The Use of Chenopodium Seeds as a Source of Food by the
          Early Peoples in Russell Cave, Alabama. Southern Indian
          Studies 12:31-32.
 
Morse, D. and P. Morse
     1983 Archaeology of the Central Mississippi Valley. Academic
          Press, Orlando, Florida.
 
Munson, P.
     1984 Weedy Plant Communities on Mud-Flats and Other
          Disturbed Habitats in the Central Illinois River
          Valley. In Experiments and Observations on Aboriginal
          Wild Plant Food Utilization in Eastern North America,
          edited by P. Munson, pp. 379-385. Prehistoric Research
          Series 6(2). Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis.
 
Murray, P. and M. Sheehan
     1984 Prehistoric Polygonum use in the Midwestern United
          States. In Experiments and Observations on Aboriginal
          Wild Food Utilization in Eastern North America, edited
          by P. Munson, pp. 369-416. Prehistoric Research Series
          6(2). Indiana Historical Society, Bloomington.
 
Nee, M.
     1990 The Domestication of Cucurbita (Cucurbitaceae).
          Economic Botany 44(3):56-68.
 
O'Brien, M.
     1987 Sendentism, Population Growth, and Resource Selection
          in the Woodland Midwest: A Review of Coevolutionary
          Developments. Current Anthropology 28(2):177-197.
 
Parmelee, P., A. Poloumpis and N. Wilson
     1972 Animals Utilized by Woodland Peoples Occupying the
          Apple Creek Site, Illinois. Illinois State Museum,.
          reports of Investigations 23, Springfield. 
 
Pearsall, D.
     1989 Paleoethnobotany. Academic Press, Orlando, Florida.
 
Peebles, C.
     1978 Determinants of Settlement Size and Location in the
          Moundville Phase. In Mississippian Settlement Patterns,
          edited by B. Smith, pp. 369-416. Academic Press,
          Orlando, Florida. 
 
Prentice, G.
     1986 Origins of Plant Domestication in the Eastern United
          States: Promoting the Individual in Archaeological
          Theory. Southeastern Archaeology 5:103-119. 
 
Pulliam, C.
     1987 Middle and Late Woodland Horticultural Practices in the
          Western Margin of the Mississippi River Valley. In
          Emergent Horticultural Economies of the Eastern
          Woodlands, edited by W. Keegan, pp. 185-200. Center for
          Archaeological Investigations, Occasional Paper No. 7.
          Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.
     
Quimby, G.
     1946 The Possibility of an Independent Agricultural Complex
          in the Southeastern United States. In Human Origins: An
          Introductory General Course in Anthropology. Selected
          Reading Series 31. University of Chicago, Chicago. 
 
Riley, T.
     1987 Ridged-Field Agriculture and the Mississippian Economic
          Pattern. In Emergent Horticultural Economies of the
          Eastern Woodlands, edited by W. Keegan, pp. 295-305.
          Center for Archaeological Investigations, Occasional
          Paper No. 7. Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. 
 
Seeman, M. and H. Wilson
     1984 The Food Potential of Chenopodium for the Prehistoric
          Midwest. In Experiments and Observations on Aboriginal
          Wild Plant Food Utilization in Eastern North America,
          edited by P. Munson, Prehistoric Research Series 6(2).
          Indiana Historical Society, Bloomington.
 
Smith, B.
     1975 Middle Mississippi Exploitation of Animal Populations.
          Museum of Anthropology, Anthropological No. 57.
          University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 
 
     1984 Chenopodium as a Prehistoric Domesticate in Eastern
          North America: Evidence from Russell Cave, Alabama.
          Science 226:165-167.
 
     1985a The Role of Chenopodium as a Domesticate in Pre-Maize
           Garden Systems of the Eastern United States.          
           Southeastern Archaeology 4:51-72.
 
     1985b Chenopodium berlandieri ssp. jonesianum: Evidence for
           a Hopewellian Domesticate from Ash Cave, Ohio.        
           Southeastern Archaeology 4:107-133.
 
     1987a The Independent Domestication of Indigenous Seed-
           Bearing Plants in Eastern North America. In Emergent
           Horticultural Economies of the Eastern Woodlands,
           edited by W. Keegan, pp. 1-47. Center for        
           Archaeological Investigations, Occasional Paper No. 7.
           Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.
 
     1987b The Economic Potential of Chenopodium berlandieri in  
           Prehistoric Eastern North America. Ethnobiology 7:29-
           54.
     
     1988 SEM and the Identification of Micro-Morphological
          Indicators of Domestication in Seed Plants. In Seed
          Plants in Scanning Electron Microscopy in Archaeology,
          edited by S. Olsen, pp. 203-213. British Archaeological
          Reports International Series 452. Oxford.
 
     1992 Prehistoric Plant Husbandry in Eastern North America.
          In The Origins of Agriculture in World Perspective,
          edited by C. Cowan and P. Watson. Smithsonian
          Institution Press, Washington, D.C.
 
Smith, B. and C. Cowan
     1987 The Age of Domesticated Chenopodium in Prehistoric
          Eastern North America: New Accelerator Dates from
          Eastern Kentucky. American Antiquity 52:355-357. 
 
Smith, B. and V. Funk
     1985 A Newly Described Subfossil Cultivar of Chenopodium
          (Chenopodiaceae). Phytologia 57:445-449. 
 
Struever, S.
     1962 Implications of Vegetal Remains from an Illinois
          Hopewell Site. American Antiquity 27:584-587.
 
     1964 The Hopewell Interaction Sphere in Riverine-Western
          Great Lakes Culture History. In Hopewellian Studies,
          edited by J. Caldwell and R. Hall, pp. 87-106. Illinois
          State Museum, Scientific Paper No. 12. Springfield.
 
Struever, S. and K. Vickery
     1973 The Beginnings of Cultivation in the Midwest-Riverine
          Area of the United States. American Anthropologist
          75:1197-1220.
 
Sturtevant, W.
     1965 Historic Carolina Algonkian Cultivation of Chenopodium
          or Amaranthus. Southeastern Archaeological Conference
          Bulletin 3:64-65.
 
Watson, P.
     1985 The Impact of Early Horticulture in the Upland
          Drainages of the Midwest and Midsouth. In Prehistoric
          Food Production in North America, edited by R. Ford,
          pp. 99-147. Museum of Anthropology, Anthropological
          Papers No. 75. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
 
     1988 Prehistoric Gardening and Agriculture in the Midwest   
          and Midsouth. In Interpretations of Culture Change in  
          the Eastern Woodlands during the Late Woodland Period,
          edited by R. Yerkes, pp. 39-67. Department of
          Anthropology, Occasional Paper in Anthropology, Ohio
          State University, Columbus.
 
     1989 Early Plant Cultivation in the Eastern Woodlands of
          North America. In Foraging and Farming, edited by D.
          Harris and G. Hillman, pp. 555-565. Unwin Hyman,
          London.
 
de Wet, J. and J. Harlan
     1975 Weeds and Domesticates: Evolution in the Man-Made
          Habitat. Economic Botany 29:99-107.
 
Wilson, H.
     1981 Domesticated Chenopodium of the Ozark Bluff Dwellers.
          Economic Botany 35:233-239.
 
Wymer, D.
     1987 The Middle Woodland-Late Woodland Interface in Central
          Ohio: Subsistence Continuity Amid Cultural Change. In
          Emergent Horticultural Economies of the Eastern
          Woodlands, edited by W. Keegan, pp. 210-216. Center for
          Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois
          University, Carbondale.
 
Yarnell, R.
     1963 Comments on Struever's Discussion of an Early Eastern
          Agricultural Complex. American Antiquity 28:547-548.
 
     1964 Aboriginal Relationships Between Culture and Plant Life
          in the Upper Great Lakes Region. Museum of
          Anthropology, Anthropological Paper No. 23, University
          of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  
 
     1965 Early Woodland Plant Remains and the Question of
          Cultivation. Florida Anthropologist 18:77-82.
 
     1972 Iva annua var. macrocarpa: Extinct American Cultigen?
          American Anthropologist 74:335-341.
 
     1974 Plant Food and Cultivation of the Salts Cavers. In
          Archaeology of the Mammoth Cave Area, edited by P.
          Watson, pp. 113-122. Academic Press, Orlando, Florida.
   
     1976 Early Plant Husbandry in Eastern North America. In
          Cultural Change and Continuity, edited by C. Cleland,
          pp. 265-273. Academic Press, New York.
 
     1978 Domestication of Sunflower and Sumpweed in Eastern
          North America. In The Nature and Status of Ethnobotany,
          edited by R. Ford, pp. 285-299. Museum of Anthropology,
          Anthropological Paper No. 67. University of Michigan.
 
     1987 A Survey of the Prehistoric Crop Plants in Eastern
          North America. Missouri Archaeologist 47:47-60.
 
     1991 Investigations Relevant to the Native Development of
          Plant Husbandry in Eastern North America: A Brief and
          Reasonably True Account. In Agricultural Origins and
          Development in the Midcontinent, edited by W. Green.
          Office of the State Archaeologist, Report 19. Iowa
          City, Iowa.
 
Yarnell, R. and J. Black
     1985 Temporal trends Indicated by a Survey of Archaic and
          Woodland Plant Food Remains from Southeastern North
          America. Southeastern Archaeology 4:93-106.
 
Yerkes, R.
     1987 Prehistoric Life on the Mississippi Floodplain: Stone
          Tool Use, Settlement Organization, and Subsistence
          Practices at the Labras Lake Site, Illinois.
          Prehistoric Archeology and Ecology Series, edited by K.
          Butzer and L. Freeman, The University of Chicago Press,
          Chicago and London.
 
 
 
                              Prepared by David R. George
                              Department of Anthropology
                              University of Connecticut
                              Storrs, CT 06268 (USA)
                              (Email: DRG93002@UCONNVM.UCONN.EDU)